2021 Hawai'i State Harm Reduction Conference

January 7-9, 2021


This year, we came together to celebrate 25 years of our conference and broadening the reach of harm reduction in the islands. Mahalo for your attendance!  Please find an archive of our conference program and recordings of our sessions below.

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"The Future Is Harm Reduction"

 

Harm Reduction is a philosophy and set of strategies for working with people engaged in potentially harmful behaviors. The main objective is to reduce the potential dangers and health risks associated with such behaviors, even for those who are not willing or able to completely stop. Harm reduction uses a non-judgmental, holistic and individualized approach to support incremental change & increase the health and well-being of individuals and communities.

The 2021 conference theme is “The Future is Harm Reduction.” Our sessions will explore how current societal issues can be aided by a harm reduction approach to mitigate the complexities individuals and communities contend with as they advocate for social change.

DAY 1: JANUARY 7, 2021

De-Escalating Hawaii’s Drug War: Defelonization, Decriminalization, Police Reform & Beyond


Moderator: Nikos Leverenz – Hawaiʻi Health & Harm Reduction Center


Speakers: Jacquie Esser – Hawaiʻi Office of the Public Defender

Sonny Ganaden – Hawaiʻi State Representative

Justice Stephen Levinson –Supreme Court of Hawaiʻi (Ret.)

Bob Merce – HCR 85 Prison Reform Task Force


Overview: This panel will address the ongoing overcriminalization of poverty and behavioral health concerns in Hawaii and solutions to reduce the burden of crowded jails and prisons and long periods of criminal legal supervision. Native Hawaiians remain disproportionately represented in the state’s criminal legal system. Administrative responses to COVID-19 failed to adequately protect the health and safety of those incarcerated and public employees. What are the current prospects for the reform of sentencing, probation, and parole, as well as police and prosecutor practices, in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic and resulting budgetary pressures? How can Hawaii best reduce the harmful impact of criminalization on underserved and vulnerable communities?




Racism, Social Justice, Ho‘oponopono, & Restorative Justice


Speakers:

Sandra Simms – Hawai'i State Board of Bar Examiners & retired judge

Lorren Walker – Hawai‘i Friends of Restorative Justice

Malina Kaulukukui – University of Hawai’i, John A. Burns School of Medicine


Overview: This interactive session will include short descriptions by the presenters of the below objectives and a breakout session by the participants to engage in an exercise to help improve social justice skills. A whole group discussion on the workshop experience will also be provided.




Grief During a Pandemic


Speaker: Leilani Maxera – Hawaiʻi Health & Harm Reduction Center


Overview: We are currently living in a state of collective trauma, brought on by global pandemic, racial and economic upheaval, and an uncertain future. This workshop will talk about the types of grief that people are dealing with and how people who serve our communities can better support ourselves, other workers, and the participants/patients in our programs.




Native Hawaiians and Incarceration


Speakers: Dr. Jamee Māhealani Miller – ʻEkolu Mea Nui


Overview: This presentation will provide an overview of Historical/Cultural Trauma from a Native Hawaiian perspective. The connection of the disparate treatment of Native Hawaiians within the criminal legal system will also be discussed. Several examples of solutions to counter the trauma individuals, families and communities experience will be shared.




Homeless Youth Outreach - A Harm Reduction Approach


Moderator: Carla Houser – Residential Youth Services and Empowerment (RYSE)


Speakers: Lee Miyashiro – Residential Youth Services and Empowerment (RYSE)

Jasreal Feeny – Residential Youth Services and Empowerment (RYSE)

Malia Packer – Hale Kipa YO!


Overview: Using a low barrier, harm reduction approach to engage youth who are experiencing homelessness.




Decolonizing Recovery by Reconnecting through Foundations of Indigenous Healing


Speakers:

Lilinoe Kauahikaua – Mālama Project

Kuʻulei Salzer – Mālama Project

Overview: Mālama Project stemmed from the awareness that often times, “recovery spaces” do not resonate with indigenous peoples, indigenous ways of healing, and indigenous perspectives. Many times, “recovery spaces and recovery language” can feel exclusive to individuals of color, and those whose cultural backgrounds are deeply rooted in community, pilina, or connections, and ʻohana. We aim to address that dichotomy of individualism on the western spectrum, as opposed to a more holistic, whole healing, or ola, that well-being of the whole unit.




Domestic Minor Sex Trafficking: Beyond Victims and Villains


Moderator: Tracy Ryan – Harm Reduction Hawaiʻi


Speaker: Alix Lutnick – University of California, Berkeley, School of Social Welfare


Overview: A lecture presentation with discussion focusing on Dr. Lutnick’s book of the same name.




Nonbinary Identities and Harm Reduction


Speaker: Avvri Rathsack – Hawaiʻi Health & Harm Reduction Center


Overview: This presentation will provide information on how Nonbinary (Enby) identities are impacted by and/or impact Harm Reduction techniques and methods of care in mental health, medical services, recovery programs, and other venues of care.




Overdose Prevention, Recognition, & Response


Speaker: Leilani Maxera – Hawaiʻi Health & Harm Reduction Center


Overview: This workshop will teach you harm reduction methods to prevent opioid overdose, how to recognize the signs of an overdose, and how to respond. You will learn how to use naloxone, the opioid overdose reversal drug, and will be able to receive a free overdose prevention kit upon completing the training.




Mental Health, Substance Abuse, & Recovery Panel


Facilitator: Kathleen Merriam – Hawaiʻi Department of Health, Adult Mental Health Division


Speakers: Eddie Mersereau – Hawaiʻi Department of Health, Behavioral Health Administration

Trisha Kajimura – Sutter Health Kahi Mohala


Overview: This panel will discuss the importance of hope, resiliency, and continuity of care when systems of care breakdown during crisis. Discussion will range from micro-level interventions to macro-level systems change. After this session, participants will be able to activate skills necessary to navigate the various methods for advocating for quality consumer care; increase their knowledge about consumer-driven care and consider the consumer voice more; practice some best practices in dealing with individuals that have mental illness and substance abuse disorders.





DAY 2: JANUARY 8, 2021

De-Escalating Hawaii’s Drug War: Defelonization, Decriminalization, Police Reform & Beyond


Moderator: Nikos Leverenz – Hawaiʻi Health & Harm Reduction Center


Speakers: Jacquie Esser – Hawaiʻi Office of the Public Defender

Sonny Ganaden – Hawaiʻi State Representative

Justice Stephen Levinson –Supreme Court of Hawaiʻi (Ret.)

Bob Merce – HCR 85 Prison Reform Task Force


Overview: This panel will address the ongoing overcriminalization of poverty and behavioral health concerns in Hawaii and solutions to reduce the burden of crowded jails and prisons and long periods of criminal legal supervision. Native Hawaiians remain disproportionately represented in the state’s criminal legal system. Administrative responses to COVID-19 failed to adequately protect the health and safety of those incarcerated and public employees. What are the current prospects for the reform of sentencing, probation, and parole, as well as police and prosecutor practices, in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic and resulting budgetary pressures? How can Hawaii best reduce the harmful impact of criminalization on underserved and vulnerable communities?




Racism, Social Justice, Ho‘oponopono, & Restorative Justice


Speakers:

Sandra Simms – Hawai'i State Board of Bar Examiners & retired judge

Lorren Walker – Hawai‘i Friends of Restorative Justice

Malina Kaulukukui – University of Hawai’i, John A. Burns School of Medicine


Overview: This interactive session will include short descriptions by the presenters of the below objectives and a breakout session by the participants to engage in an exercise to help improve social justice skills. A whole group discussion on the workshop experience will also be provided.




Grief During a Pandemic


Speaker: Leilani Maxera – Hawaiʻi Health & Harm Reduction Center


Overview: We are currently living in a state of collective trauma, brought on by global pandemic, racial and economic upheaval, and an uncertain future. This workshop will talk about the types of grief that people are dealing with and how people who serve our communities can better support ourselves, other workers, and the participants/patients in our programs.




Native Hawaiians and Incarceration


Speakers: Dr. Jamee Māhealani Miller – ʻEkolu Mea Nui


Overview: This presentation will provide an overview of Historical/Cultural Trauma from a Native Hawaiian perspective. The connection of the disparate treatment of Native Hawaiians within the criminal legal system will also be discussed. Several examples of solutions to counter the trauma individuals, families and communities experience will be shared.




Homeless Youth Outreach - A Harm Reduction Approach


Moderator: Carla Houser – Residential Youth Services and Empowerment (RYSE)


Speakers: Lee Miyashiro – Residential Youth Services and Empowerment (RYSE)

Jasreal Feeny – Residential Youth Services and Empowerment (RYSE)

Malia Packer – Hale Kipa YO!


Overview: Using a low barrier, harm reduction approach to engage youth who are experiencing homelessness.




Decolonizing Recovery by Reconnecting through Foundations of Indigenous Healing


Speakers:

Lilinoe Kauahikaua – Mālama Project

Kuʻulei Salzer – Mālama Project

Overview: Mālama Project stemmed from the awareness that often times, “recovery spaces” do not resonate with indigenous peoples, indigenous ways of healing, and indigenous perspectives. Many times, “recovery spaces and recovery language” can feel exclusive to individuals of color, and those whose cultural backgrounds are deeply rooted in community, pilina, or connections, and ʻohana. We aim to address that dichotomy of individualism on the western spectrum, as opposed to a more holistic, whole healing, or ola, that well-being of the whole unit.




Domestic Minor Sex Trafficking: Beyond Victims and Villains


Moderator: Tracy Ryan – Harm Reduction Hawaiʻi


Speaker: Alix Lutnick – University of California, Berkeley, School of Social Welfare


Overview: A lecture presentation with discussion focusing on Dr. Lutnick’s book of the same name.




Nonbinary Identities and Harm Reduction


Speaker: Avvri Rathsack – Hawaiʻi Health & Harm Reduction Center


Overview: This presentation will provide information on how Nonbinary (Enby) identities are impacted by and/or impact Harm Reduction techniques and methods of care in mental health, medical services, recovery programs, and other venues of care.




Overdose Prevention, Recognition, & Response


Speaker: Leilani Maxera – Hawaiʻi Health & Harm Reduction Center


Overview: This workshop will teach you harm reduction methods to prevent opioid overdose, how to recognize the signs of an overdose, and how to respond. You will learn how to use naloxone, the opioid overdose reversal drug, and will be able to receive a free overdose prevention kit upon completing the training.




Mental Health, Substance Abuse, & Recovery Panel


Facilitator: Kathleen Merriam – Hawaiʻi Department of Health, Adult Mental Health Division


Speakers: Eddie Mersereau – Hawaiʻi Department of Health, Behavioral Health Administration

Trisha Kajimura – Sutter Health Kahi Mohala


Overview: This panel will discuss the importance of hope, resiliency, and continuity of care when systems of care breakdown during crisis. Discussion will range from micro-level interventions to macro-level systems change. After this session, participants will be able to activate skills necessary to navigate the various methods for advocating for quality consumer care; increase their knowledge about consumer-driven care and consider the consumer voice more; practice some best practices in dealing with individuals that have mental illness and substance abuse disorders.





DAY 3: JANUARY 9, 2021

Who are E2BN?


E2BN formed in 1999, as a regional broadband consortium. They remain a not-for-profit organisation with a board of directors of local authority representatives. E2BN own and let the framework on a 4 year term to WCL UK Ltd. E2BN will appear on all contracts as the 'contracting authority'.




Who are WCL UK?


WCL UK won the E2BN framework tender so are therefore custodians of Everything ICT until 2023. All official documentation (e.g. invoices) will be from WCL UK.




Do I need to register to use the framework?


For customers, there's no registration necessary. It's as simple telling us what your requirements are, recieving a quote and sending a PO. For suppliers, there is an evaluation process in order to be awarded a place. The framework carries out extensive due dilligence on any supplier that applies to be on the framework. We are therefore able to recommend any of our approved suppliers in confidence, knowing they will deliver best value every time.




Who will invoice us?


Invoices will always come from WCL UK Ltd. We then pay the relevant supplier(s).




How do I know I'm getting best value from a Direct Award?


This question comes up almost daily. The idea of a Direct Award is very attractive to most as it saves so much time, money and effort over running a tender. However, it’s a change from the traditional procurement methods so it’s understandable to want validation. When it comes to ensuring value for money on equipment (rather than services) the process negates the need for a tender and is as follows:

  • Manufacturers are multi-national corporations who produce hundreds of thousands of units in factories around the world.
  • They typically have what’s known as a ‘channel model’ where they sell in bulk to Distributors; Distributors sell to Resellers; and Resellers sell to individual customers.
  • Distributors are typically ‘national’. They are wholesalers with one or more warehouses in a country. They buy thousands of units at a time and store them ready for sale to Resellers.
  • Resellers are ‘local’ and sell direct to customers. They typically buy small numbers of units (anything from 1 to hundreds) from a Distributor when a customer places an order.
  • Most Manufacturers and Distributors run what’s commonly known as a “Deal-Reg” scheme. Deal registration is when a Reseller says “I’ve got a customer who is interested in buying X units, mark that deal as mine”. This does two things. Firstly, the Reseller gets given the best price for those units. Secondly, it stops other resellers going to that customer and undercutting the price and undermining the sales process. Other resellers can express an interest in a deal, but won’t be given the best pricing for those units. If a customer says “I don’t want to buy from Reseller 1, I want to buy from Reseller 2 instead” they can of course do that, but at that point Reseller 2 has to effectively buy the units from Reseller 1. Because Reseller 2 needs to make a profit to survive, that additional margin is usually passed on to the customer.
Everything ICT have been developing relationships with Manufacturers (e.g. Dell, Cisco, Lenovo) to try and ensure that Everything ICT customers can get access to that nationally best pricing. This has been very challenging as it cuts across the traditional Deal-Reg schemes, but the Manufacturers see a distinct advantage in being aligned to the framework so are prepared to enter into arrangements with us, which is great because we have better visibility on pricing and therefore value for money for customers. One of the challenges we often get is “I can go onto Google and get it cheaper”. My answer to that is yes you can, but be aware of the following:
  • You can usually buy one or two units, not the quantities you need
  • There are numerous examples of buying what are known as “Grey Imports”. This is typically kit built and destined for another market (e.g. Asia) and comes without warranty, support or backup.
  • If something goes wrong (e.g. kit gets stolen in transit; or doesn’t work when you try to connect it to your network – we have examples of both) then it’s your problem to sort. If you buy through Everything ICT and something goes wrong, it’s our problem. We’re your insurance policy.
So with that background knowledge, I come back to the exam question about how do we ensure value for money on equipment for customers. The 2 key things we do on a daily basis to help are:
  • Soft internal benchmarking against resellers. We do thousands of orders each year so we can do quick internal comparisons against other deals to ensure best value.
  • Testing a similar specification for a different manufacturer (e.g. comparing laptops from Dell against similar devices from HP or Fujitsu) to see if there are better deals on equipment that will do the job just as well.




Who can use the framework?


The framework is open to any public sector organisation to use.





HHHRC RECEIVES $25,000 GRANT FROM H.T. HAYASHI FOUNDATION

Hawaiʻi Health and Harm Reduction Center was awarded $25,000 to fund grief recovery, education, and certification for its staff with the goal of eventually extending these resources to other social service providers in the community.